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Lotto Stadio Potenza V 200 Review

Lotto Stadio Potenza Testing

When it comes to classic Italian fare, they don’t come much more iconic than what the folks at Lotto have on offer. We haven’t seen much in the way of new releases from the brand lately, so it is a pleasant surprise to see this one introduced to the market. It is the Stadio Potenza V 200, a boot tailored toward players in need of a control boot option.

There is a much more modern take to this one compared to predecessors in the range, with a synthetic upper employed and some additional Power & Control micro-injected inserts along the forefoot. It all makes for a new type of in-game performance from Lotto – but is that a good or a bad thing? Here is our full review.

You can currently find these boots at soccer.com, listed for $149.99.
(Bonus: through December, use code 1LOTTO20 to get 20% off a pair.)

Initial Reaction

It is unusual to see Lotto take a traditional leather upper away from the range, but they have. Adding a microfiber has its positives and negatives, so it will be interesting to see what these have on offer. The design is pretty clean, although the black inserts along the forefoot give them a very distinguished look.

Lotto Stadio Potenza IV Review

Lotto Stadio Potenza IV Touch and Control

Breaking In and Comfort

Right out of the box, there is a slightly rigid feel about the Stadio Potenza, basically because they are such a full bodied boot. They weigh in at the 10oz mark and have the feel of old school release. Lotto hasn’t skimped on the materials used, something that plays favorably to the durability of the boot but could cause concern to players checking them out for the first time. There is plenty of flex to the upper and the soleplate, but again they just feel full bodied and that is important to note – you are not getting a speed boot here!

When you get them on and into play, they actually feel surprisingly comfortable, so much so that I could tell from the first training session that they were going to be game ready right from the off. It is still worth wearing them in a training first, not only to ensure they fit you properly but also to loosen up the stitching. Around the ankle line, Lotto has gone with a pretty standard, lightly cushioned material that feels snug and provides a secure fit during wear. Inside the boot, I did have to give them a quick rub with some fine sandpaper to remove the squelch sound that happens with smoother materials along the heel – you know that annoying sound that sometimes happens with new boots? Sandpaper adds a little extra roughness to the area and allows your sock to grasp it. Easy solution if you suffer a similar experience.

Are They Power or Control?

Defining these as a control or power boot is really down to personal interpretation. I’m giving them the control label as the technology placed on the forefoot – micro-injected inserts- sits in an area more associated with passing and general on-ball movement. It doesn’t sit high enough along the strike zone, and in general the boot has a much more of a midfield player mold about them. For those that are not convinced, you are free to call them a Control/Power hybrid!

Lotto Stadio Potenza IV Lacing

Stadio Potenza IV

In Game Performance

A new microfiber upper and micro-injected inserts along the forefoot – what do both of these additions have to offer? First to the microfiber, which is a dramatic shift for a range known to be associated with classic leather. Lotto has obviously taken the older model and looked at ways to improve performance in a wider variety of circumstances. The benefit to a synthetic material is added durability – they are water-repellent and they do not soak in moisture like a leather would. Seeing as we are headed into winter months when the weather pattern shifts to rain, it makes some sense that the design team decided a change in direction would be beneficial. In terms of touch, the material has a decently natural feel on the ball and a slightly stretchy feel that can only prove useful as you look to take control. Lotto has also added a light micro-texture to the material, in the form of minute indentations. Again, this is something that only offers a positive as a smooth material is more likely to result in less friction between ball and boot.

Placed into the microfiber upper is a new set of Power & Control micro-injected inserts. We have seen similar additions to boots in the past, with a pretty close comparison being the most recent Puma PowerCat series. In total, there are 11 individual pieces placed across the forefoot so they obviously cover a vast amount of area. This means that they are intended for use in different situations. For example, along the inner side of the forefoot for first touch and short passes, and along the outer side for times when you need to dribble out of trouble or knock a ball with some spin. Raised a few millimeters off the surface, there is definition to each piece. In play, they are definitely noticeable and you do loose some natural feel on the ball. But, and it is a big BUT, they offer plenty of positive characteristics as you get on the ball. There is a definite rebound effect to the material that makes them ideal for driving long, low passes across the grass, and they provide a slightly tacky feel as you take the ball in. You know when you are knocking a ball around by yourself and you drive a ball super high in the air? These are the boots you will want to be wearing for taking the ball down very effectively. In a regular boot, you should be able to keep the ball close to your feet, but with these on it seems to be just that little bit easier!

As is the case with most players these days, I’m faced with the challenge of playing on both natural grass and artificial turf. It causes a dilemma when picking out boots, as players try to find a medium in one boot to use on both surfaces. My advice in that case is to go with conical studs, and I am a sucker for the exact implementation that Lotto has gone with. The studs are pretty low profile, placed in a 9 up top and 4 in the back configuration, with a little touch of lime green coloring on the tips for dramatic effect. From a performance perspective, they offer excellent traction and really keep you stable through wear. Of course, this won’t be the case if you are, well “clumsy”, but for the general player that has the ability to keep themselves in a prone position, they are a top option.

Lotto Stadio Potenza IV Studs

Lotto Stadio Potenza IV Soleplate

How do they Fit?

This is a very well built boot that features a compact fit. They are definitely true to size when it comes to length, and they offer a surprisingly spacious feel around the forefoot. That doesn’t seem to be the case when you try and slip them on for the first time, as they have a slightly rigid feel. Once your foot gets inside the boot, they feel very comfortable and the forefoot has a little extra wiggle room, mostly thanks to the stretchy microfiber upper. For players that require a very wide fit, they won’t be as comfortable but for a medium/wide fit they are ideal. Stick with true to size on these.

Lotto Stadio Potenza IV Heel

Protected Heel

There is no visually obvious heel counter on these, but Lotto has implemented a very sturdy system in the area that will keep you well protected in play. It actually makes them an ideal option for defenders who get stuck in on tackles or players who generally need something more protective wrapped around their foot.

Critics Notes

The weight of the boot – featuring a new synthetic upper, I’d anticipate them drop well below the 10oz mark. As above, they have a full bodied feel about them that is good from a durability perspective, but it reduces the number of players these boots are now suited toward.

You can currently find these boots at soccer.com, listed for $149.99.
(Bonus: through December, use code 1LOTTO20 to get 20% off a pair.)

The Skinny Summary

Highlight: A new-age, modern take on the classic Stadio Potenza range that provides players with a very clean, close touch on the ball.
Category: Control with some elements of Power about them.
Weight: 10oz
Would I Buy Them: I definitely enjoyed what these had to offer, and they are a solid option from a price perspective. But ultimately, they are not a boot that suits my style of play.
Player Position: Midfielders can benefit from the control aspect of the boot, and I see defenders really enjoying what they have on offer. Keepers and hold-up forwards can also excel in them. Pacey players beware on this one, not the ideal boot in terms of acceleration.

When it comes to classic Italian fare, they don't come much more iconic than what the folks at Lotto have on offer. We haven't seen much in the way of new releases from the brand lately, so it is a pleasant surprise to see this one introduced to the market.…

Boot Score

Comfort
Performance
Technology
Visual Effect
Control Category

HIGHLIGHTS: A new-age, modern take on the classic Stadio Potenza range that provides players with a very clean, close touch on the ball. Midfielders can benefit from the control aspect of the boot, and I see defenders really enjoying what they have on offer. Keepers and hold-up forwards can also excel in them. Pacey players beware on this one, not the ideal boot in terms of acceleration.

User Rating: 4.18 ( 4 votes)
70

About Bryan Byrne

The mastermind behind the revolution that is SoccerCleats101. Bryan started this website back in 2008 and has been testing boots on a daily basis ever since. Check out our About Page for more details on Bryan and the website.

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